Coronals

Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue. Sounds are made with either the tip of the tongue or the tongue blade as the active articulator. The coronal consonants are divided into:
apical: If the tip of the tongue may contact the inner mouth it is illustrated as the term of apical consonants.
laminal: If the blade of the tongue makes contact with the inner mouth the process is defined as laminal consonants.

Coronal places of articulation
Dental/Interdental: Sounds are made with the tip of the tongue and rimes between the upper and lower teeth; called alveolar ridge. English interdental sounds include [ ] and [].

Alveolar sounds are produced with the tip of the tongue that come close or touch the bony ridge behind the upper teeth; called the alveolar ridge. English alveolar sounds include [t], [d], [n], [s], [z], [l].

Post-alveolar sounds are made with the tip of the tongue approaching or touching the rear alveolar ridge or the area behind it. There is only one post-alveolar sound in the English language named as the lenis [r].

Palato-alveolar sounds are made with the tip of the tongue that touches the alveolar ridge and with the simultaneous raise of the blade of the tongue towards the hard palate. The English palato-alvolar sounds include [], [], [] and [j]. Furthermore combinations like []and [] belong to palato-alveolar sounds.